(Source: misswallflower)

70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 
70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 
70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 
70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 
70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 
70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 
70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 

70sscifiart:

unboxup:

Vintage sci-fi pictures ranging from the 20s to the 60s.

I’m reblogging something that isn’t from the 70s… sorry, guys, but I figured you might want a look at my personal blog, where I dump all the cool sci-fi stuff I find that isn’t from the 70s. 

(Source: wunderkindof)

melvillehouse:

themysticmark:

Stay alert! Report any suspicious space lizard behaviour to your local internet forum immediately. They are among us.

This was easily my favorite book for a year or so. I still put red pepper flakes on everything, just in case.

clairelegrand:

jeannepompadour:

Men’s court coat, 1775-89


ooo pretty coat

Would make a good pirate captain’s coat. clairelegrand:

jeannepompadour:

Men’s court coat, 1775-89


ooo pretty coat

Would make a good pirate captain’s coat.

clairelegrand:

jeannepompadour:

Men’s court coat, 1775-89

ooo pretty coat

Would make a good pirate captain’s coat.

"Mr. Electrico said to me, in a whisper, ‘Live forever.’ And I decided to."
"Every first draft is perfect, because all a first draft has to do is exist."
— Jane Smiley (via inspired-to-write)

austinkleon:

Something small, every day

I wrote a little something for today’s newsletter about how I work:

Every day, no matter what, I make a poem and post it online. Most days they’re mediocre, some days they’re great, and some days they’re awful. (Jerry Garcia: “You go diving for pearls every night but sometimes you end up with clams.”) But it doesn’t matter to me whether the day’s poem was good or not, what matters is that it got done. I did the work. I didn’t break the chain. If I have a shitty day, I go to sleep and know that tomorrow I get to take another whack at it.

Read it here.

QuestionI always appreciate your pragmatic and straightforward opinion on working and creating. I'm a creative nonfiction writer by night and an uninspired nonprofit marketer by day. What's your advice for someone like me who needs to pay the bills but just wants to be immersed in creating and building community around that? I'm in near-constant purgatory at work, and I hate it. Should I just shut my mouth and keep at it? Is this forever? Answer

austinkleon:

I get asked this question more than almost any other. And it’s something I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about. Here’s what I wrote about it in Steal Like An Artist:

I kept a day job until I made more money off art than I did at my day job. And even then, it was scary for me to leave it. Everybody always tosses out that tired “do what you love, and the rest will follow” shit, and I don’t buy it. (I usually say, “Do what you love and the debt will follow.”)

You have to pay the bills and feed the mouths, and you do it however you can. I got married when I was 23—I’ve had a family to support for a while now. I guess in my attitude, I’m a lot like Philip Larkin:

I was brought up to think you had to have a job, and write in your spare time, like Trollope. Then, when you started earning enough money by writing, you phase the job out. But in fact I was over fifty before I could have “lived by my writing”—and then only because I had edited a big anthology—and by that time you think, Well, I might as well get my pension, since I’ve gone so far….All I can say is, having a job hasn’t been a hard price to pay for economic security.

And my experience has been that economic security has always helped my art along more than any kind of “spiritual” freedom or whatever. 

“The trick is,” film executive Tom Rothman says, “from the business side, to try to be fiscally responsible so you can be creatively reckless.”

One thing I would recommend to you is to see the day job as a positive, not a negative:

A day job gives you money, a connection to the world, and a routine. Freedom from financial stress also means freedom in your art. As photographer Bill Cunningham says, “If you don’t take money, they cant tell you what to do.”

Because the real truth is, once you start making money doing what you love, it BECOMES A JOB. And with it comes all the hassle of a job. Here’s Larkin again: 

You can live by “being a writer,” or “being a poet,” if you’re prepared to join the cultural entertainment industry, and take handouts from the Arts Council (not that there are as many of them as there used to be) and be a “poet in residence” and all that. I suppose I could have said—it’s a bit late now—I could have had an agent, and said, Look, I will do anything for six months of the year as long as I can be free to write for the other six months. Some people do this, and I suppose it works for them.

In other words: you always have a day job. (My friend Hugh calls this “The Sex & Cash Theory.”) Right now my day job is going around giving talks and writing and selling books. It’s a good day job, but “doing what I love” would actually mean sitting around all day reading and drawing and making these goofy poems. Guess how much that pays? Not much. And guess how much time I actually get to do that stuff? Not much.

Anyways, this is supposed to encourage you. Every artist without a sugar mama or a trust fund or extreme luck has had to deal with this.

Just hang in there.

This is what I recommend: get up early. Get up early and work for two hours on the thing you really care about. Then, when you’re done, go to your job. When you get there, your boss can’t take the thing you really care about away from you, because you already did it. And you know you’ll get to do it tomorrow morning, as long as you make it through today.

The “meaning” in your job is: it pays the bills. Get as good at it as you can, because it’ll make the job more interesting to you, and it will provide you exits to another one. Then find the rest of your meaning elsewhere.

For more inspiration from people better and smarter than me, click this tag: “Keep your day job.”

victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]
victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO
[noun]
1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.
2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.
Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).
[Jim des Rivieres]

victoriousvocabulary:

IMAGO

[noun]

1. the last stage an insect attains during its metamorphosis; the adult form of an insect.

2. Psychology: an often idealized image of a person, usually a parent, formed in childhood and persisting unconsciously into adulthood.

Etymology: from New Latin, Latin imāgō (image).

[Jim des Rivieres]

"

It turns out procrastination is not typically a function of laziness, apathy or work ethic as it is often regarded to be. It’s a neurotic self-defense behavior that develops to protect a person’s sense of self-worth.

You see, procrastinators tend to be people who have, for whatever reason, developed to perceive an unusually strong association between their performance and their value as a person. This makes failure or criticism disproportionately painful, which leads naturally to hesitancy when it comes to the prospect of doing anything that reflects their ability — which is pretty much everything.

But in real life, you can’t avoid doing things. We have to earn a living, do our taxes, have difficult conversations sometimes. Human life requires confronting uncertainty and risk, so pressure mounts. Procrastination gives a person a temporary hit of relief from this pressure of “having to do” things, which is a self-rewarding behavior. So it continues and becomes the normal way to respond to these pressures.

Particularly prone to serious procrastination problems are children who grew up with unusually high expectations placed on them. Their older siblings may have been high achievers, leaving big shoes to fill, or their parents may have had neurotic and inhuman expectations of their own, or else they exhibited exceptional talents early on, and thereafter “average” performances were met with concern and suspicion from parents and teachers.

"
— David Cain, “Procrastination Is Not Laziness” (via thatkindofwoman)

For reasons.

(via karinanotcinerina)

(Source: error4583324)


stay in, get cosy
  • stay in, get cosy

(Source: myidealhome)

spookyloop:

mistgates:

Victorian Ghost Photography

 I love this so much.
spookyloop:

mistgates:

Victorian Ghost Photography

 I love this so much.
spookyloop:

mistgates:

Victorian Ghost Photography

 I love this so much.
spookyloop:

mistgates:

Victorian Ghost Photography

 I love this so much.

spookyloop:

mistgates:

Victorian Ghost Photography

 I love this so much.